My work is made entirely of felted wool I make and dye by hand. Making my own materials is an important part of my artistic process because it allows me to have a hand in every aspect of creating my art from start to finish. The unpredictability involved always yields unique and interesting results. Oftentimes holes, irregular edges and sizes, and interesting variations in color and texture occur. I never get the same shape or color twice, which makes each piece of felt I create totally one of a kind. I use the material and its imperfections to inspire me and guide my decision-making process about the art I create with it. Using traditional fiber art techniques such as felting, dyeing, and stitching, I turn what was once just plain white wool into colorful and dynamic abstract landscapes.

My inspiration comes from aerial photography, satellite images, and textures and shapes found in natural environments. From high above, the details of a place are stripped away leaving only an elegant design of intersecting, shapes, colors, and lines. I take thousands of miles of land and turn it into mere inches of felt and stitching, providing a unique overview of an expansive space that cannot adequately be seen and understood from the ground. I am particularly interested in representing landscapes where natural and man-made environments intersect and have a compelling influence on each other. I often use as inspiration areas affected by climate change, natural disasters, and human use. My intent is to create a simplified and thought-provoking way to view land, our impact on it, and relationship to it while leaving the work open to interpretation, putting no demands on the viewer to see one particular type of landscape over another.

Taylor Painter-Wolfe, 2018